Black and White, Color, depth of field, Editorial, Landscapes, Nature, Photography, things seen, Travel, vacation

Punalu’u Beach (black sand beach)

Yesterday saw us hitting the road to explore a novelty of the island; Punalu’u Beach, singularly noted for the features of its black sand and the presence of Green Sea Turtles. Unfortunately, the turtles did not make an appearance during our time there.

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Black and White, Color, Editorial, Everyday Life, Photography, Street Photography

Kailua-Kona: Long Days, Pleasant Nights

I am in love with the big island. These days and nights of relaxation and pleasant idleness have made an indelible impression on me. If you, dear reader, have ever had the notion of visiting I urge you to act on it.

Of course I’m keeping pleasant company which makes a massive additional pleasure (Natasha, my love you increase my joy ten-fold).

Now I’m off to find new diversions, Aloha!

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Artsy, Color, depth of field, Editorial, Photography

Chimes

As adults we lose something of the whole-hearted seriousness which children have at their play (and which F. Nietszche observed). It might be a little precious to say there’s something to learn from it, but I do think often that we are pulled in so many directions with responsibilities and other demands on our time that we can let the attention our passions deserve fall by the wayside. The struggle is to find a time and place for what feeds the soul among the hectic day-to-day.

Chimes
Chimes
Artsy, Black and White, Editorial, Photography

Broken Window

Broken Window - March 2015
Broken Window – March 2015

 

Where does the appeal in things abandoned and left to decay come? Is it because we strive so hard as a society and as individuals to instill order into an existence that is inherently chaotic? Does this make abandoned buildings, derelict hospitals, car graveyards and the like seductive in the truth of their inevitability. Entropy endures even on a cellular level, and we can forestall it but not escape it.

I personally don’t find anything disheartening in this. Life is a process and even though it has ends, the thread continues. Where this picture was taken there were once three structures. When new they served their purpose probably for years. As need and circumstance changed they fell to disuse. They are popular with photographers for engagement photos. On this most recent visit one has been demolished, it’s stone and timbers gathered into a heap and cordoned off. It was about time as it was ramshackle and likely near collapse on its own. If nothing else is built in place of it then nature will reclaim the space. It is all a process.

Black and White, Color, Editorial, Everyday Photos, Photography

Barns

Barn #1
Barn #1
Barn #2
Barn #2
Barn #3
Barn #3

 

As mentioned previously I’ve been focusing more on other parts of my photography. I love blogging and other online pursuits, but there is something more satisfying about putting prints in people’s hands.

I’ve written before about why I feel prints are important. Not just because they put money in an artists pocket, but because all our digital images are ephemeral. Each of us is so inundated with the an explosion of images that it all runs together. It can be sensory overload. Images that resonate, that really speak to us, in my opinion need to be preserved in some other way than a hyperlink or a jpg on a hard drive that will some day soon be unreadable as technology marches on.

Prints are not eternal. However, they do have a longevity that can last a lifetime. I make prints of my own work for myself all the time. Partially because I use them to aid my memories of my experiences, footnotes to the passage of my days.

Then again, sometimes I just take pictures of barns. All currents in the same river.

© Desmond Manny 2015
Editorial, Open Source, Photography

FOSS Raw Editor Roundup

Some time has passed since I have given an overview of what is available to photographers when it comes to Open-Source RAW editors. In that time all of the major contenders have since continued development and a few new hopefuls have appeared on the scene. In all it is a fantastic time to be a photographer who either runs GNULinux as their main operating system, or simply has an interest in running Open-Source alternatives to proprietary software even on Windows or a Mac.

This article assumes some knowledge of the nature and benefits of shooting RAW. If you are unfamiliar with the format you may wish to start here.

Consider: While Free and Open-Source Software is often offered gratis, there are no barriers to making monetary donations or contributing in other ways (code, helping the community with tutorials, etc.). There is nothing in the philosophy against giving or giving back in one way or another. One of the main strengths of the FOSS community is the direct interaction between users and developers. As a user I personally feel there is an ethical imperative to give back in some way.

Currently I am running a 64-bit Linux distribution using the KDE desktop. At another time I may cover the benefits for photographers using the KDE desktop because there are several. Independent of DE (Desktop Environment) all RAW and image editors available for Linux are available to photographers with one or two caveats. Currently I have installed 8 RAW capable editors; Darktable, Digikam, Fotoxx, GTKgallery, Photivo, Rawstudio, Rawtherapee, and UFRaw.

Comparing their processing abilities led me to the admittedly casual conclusion that any Open Source photographer can make his/her choice of editor dependent on personal need and temperament. Want an editor that also provides asset management? There are several options. Want something that allows selective edits? Still got options.

At a later date I intend to go more in-depth about the programs I currently have installed, but for this post I’m going to give a brief example of the results to be obtained with each.

For comparison I am providing the jpg from a Canon DSLR. No editing has been done to the jpg so it is provided as-is.

In-camera JPG
In-camera JPG

 

Rawtherapee (Linux/OSX/Windows)

Rawtherapee is currently my number one pick for a RAW editor. It has a strong history and is in current development. Rawtherapee covers about 98% of my needs. Recent additions have seen the incorporation of a set of tools dedicated to black and white conversion, and another to film emulation. From experience I can say that both are very useful tools. There are a number of demosaicing engines available, including some specific to high-noise images.

Rawtherapee Processed
Rawtherapee Processed
Rawtherapee
Rawtherapee

 

Rawstudio (Linux)

Rawstudio is a much older RAW editing program but still useful. Development seems slowed dead so there may be some trouble with very recent cameras: for instance it can not read files from my Fuji X10, or other X-trans sensor cameras. If you are using older equipment, or have older files to process, it still wouldn’t hurt to consider it. I’ve been very impressed by black and white images produced from Rawstudio, and it’s controls are a good balance between simplicity and effectiveness.

Rawstudio Processed
Rawstudio Processed
Rawstudio
Rawstudio

 

Darktable (Linux/OSX with Macports)

Darktable is a program which often gets mentioned as an Open-source editor. Not surprisingly, Darktable has a wealth of useful features that make it an appealing package. Selective editing is one area in which Darktable stands apart from the crowd. Having the ability to selectively edit contrast, exposure, and levels for separate parts of an image is extremely powerful as an option. Darktable is my go to for any image that needs this kind of precision. Darktable also provides asset management functionality and can import images from cameras.

Darktable processing
Darktable processing
Darktable
Darktable

 

Digikam (Linux/OSX with Macports/Windows)

Digikam has a healthy following among some photographers. Initially a part of the KDE desktop it has garnered a wide user base outside of GNULinux . I have to admit I do not usually install Digikam when running other desktop environments (XFCE, Pantheon, Cinnamon) because I find bringing in KDE dependencies can be problematic. Windows users do not have to consider this.

Digikam is not only a RAW editor but a fantastic program for image management as well. Digikam can import images from cameras and has robust features to organize your photos in addition to its editing functions.

Digikam Processed
Digikam Processed
digikam
Digikam

 

Fotoxx (Linux)

Fotoxx is a program I was unfamiliar with until shortly before this article. The developers claim that, “The goal is to meet most user needs while remaining fast and easy to use.” With that in mind I do have to say they are well on their way. Initially, it takes some getting used to because it differs from the majority of editors. A trip in to the “user settings” dialogue doesn’t hurt either. Fotoxx makes use of DCRaw to process RAW files.

Fotoxx Processed
Fotoxx Processed
Fotoxx
Fotoxx

 

GTKRawGallery (Linux)

Another program I’ve become only recently acquainted with is GTKRawGallery. GTKRawGallery is another program that attempts to put ease-of-use at the forefront. It has another unique UI, but users shouldn’t have too much difficulty as everything is laid out in tabs along the program’s right side. GTKRawGallery also makes use of DCRaw.

GTKRawGallery Processed
GTKRawGallery Processed
gtkrawgallery
GTKRawGallery

 

Photivo (Linux/OSX/Windows)

Photivo is an extremely versatile editor with a lot, and I do mean A LOT, of options. There may be something of a learning curve in finding which options most effectively do what you want, but once you do there is a lot that can be done here. My understanding is that Photivo shares some code “DNA” with Rawtherapee but the similarity is all behind-the-scenes. I really like a lot about Photivo even though some of its functions are a little too mysterious (took me a while to figure out how to get full-size output). Like all the offerings it is worth delving into to discover for yourself.

Photivo Processed
Photivo Processed
photivo
Photivo

 

UFRaw (Linux)

Lastly is UFRaw which is the venerable veteran of Linux RAW editing. It appears at first glance not to be as polished as some of the others, and admittedly its tool-set seems a little lacking, but for basic RAW processing it is just as effective as the other offerings. This was one of the first programs for RAW editing I tried in my transition from proprietary OS’s to GNULinux.

UFRaw Processed
UFRaw Processed
UFRaw
UFRaw

 

All Things Considered

As can be seen from the images above these are all very usable options. In general my recommendation is that for more advanced users Darktable, Digikam, and Rawtherapee make a good starting point, for the adventurous Photivo is just as capable but has a steeper learning curve, and the same goes for UFRaw. For more casual needs Fotoxx and GTKRawGallery are definitely where it’s at. Rawstudio, for its lack of support of more recent cameras, is only going to be useful for some.

Note: Lightzone, which has a strong following as well, was not included in this roundup because it had issues running on my 64-bit system.